Video & Audio

This page lists links to video and audio downloads for past food-related talks in Oxford, and to other interesting webcasts from Oxford University.


Oxford London Lecture 2015: Knowledge, nudge and nanny: opportunities to improve the nation’s diet.

March 2015

Professor Susan Jebb gave the annual Oxford London lecture, speaking about approaches to tackling obesity.


Multi-Level Food System Seminar Series

February/March 2015

The Food Systems Research Group in the Environmental Change Institute and the Oxford Martin Programme on the Future of Food organised a seminar series based on a number of food system levels: national, subnational, major cities and a provincial city. The overall aim was to discuss the connections, linkages, food flows and governance arrangements at the different spatial levels. The seminars covered a range of issues and how these issues change depending on the spatial resolution.

Seminar 1 - Designing Sustainable Diets at a National Level – a Case Study of Sweden

Speaker: Dr Elin Röös, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences

Livestock production is responsible for 14,5% of global GHG emissions and one third of arable land is used to grow feed. The consumption of meat and dairy must be reduced in the developed world to meet sustainability targets. But what is a sustainable level of animal products in the diet? Many advocate raising animals on resources that are not suitable for human consumption such as grass from marginal land unsuited for crop production and by-products, while using arable land to produce human edible foods. But how much meat and what kind of diet would such an approach result in? In this seminar I will present and discuss the sustainability of such diets produced in Sweden and its implications for Swedish agriculture.

Seminar 2 - Regional Food Systems For Improved Resilience

Speaker: Professor Michael Hamm, Michigan State University

We in the developed world have tended to concentrate our food sources in areas with a ‘comparative advantage’ for production, typically for climatic reasons. The cost of energy, post-harvest handling technology, and varietal development has made this possible. We have entered a period where increased extreme weather events and climatic shifts make this a more risky venture – and provide a strong rationale for regionalized food systems to increase resilience of our food system and help insure food security. This seminar uses examples from the United States and East Africa to illustrate the notion and rationale.

Seminar 4 - Community Initiatives for a Sustainable Food System in Oxford

Speakers: Tom Curtis, 3Keel & Julian Cottee, 3Keel & Good Food Oxford

The FoodPrinting Oxford report (2013) developed a methodology to quantify for the first time the environmental impacts and dependencies of food consumption in Oxford in terms of land, water and energy use, and greenhouse gas emissions. In addition it evaluated options for taking action at city level and identified groups of organisations and businesses able to act in different areas. Included in this options appraisal was an assessment of the productive capacity around Oxford’s geographical ‘city-region’.  A year later, a new organisation, Good Food Oxford, took shape develop the city’s capacity to coordinate effective food sustainability activities. We will report on the approach that has been taken and how new cross-sector collaborations have started to build on the FoodPrinting report to take on the complex challenge of behaviour change.


Well fed? The health and environmental implications of our food choices

November 2014

Professor Susan Jebb, Dr Mike Rayner and Dr Tara Garnett discuss issues of obesity and how nutritional recommendations interact with the environmental impact of our diets.

Non-fat, low-fat, saturated fat, trans fats, healthy fats - in an era where we seem to be constantly bombarded with often conflicting messages about our diets, is all this information actually making us any healthier? How can we cut through media hysteria and make wise choices about the food we eat, and what impact do our consumption habits have, not just on our own health but that of the planet?

This event was part of the Oxford Martin School's seminar series on "Health in the 21st century: what’s new?"


"Is the planet full?" Panel Debate, Oxford Martin School, at the FT Weekend Oxford Literary Festival

March 2014

Speakers: Professor Ian Goldin, Dr Toby Ord, Professor Sarah Harper, Professor Robyn Norton and Professor Charles Godfray

What are the impacts of population growth? Can our planet support the demands of the ten billion people anticipated to be the world's population by the middle of this century?

Leading academics outline their views on how to mitigate the impacts of Earth's burgeoning population in the "Is the Planet Full?" panel debate at the Oxford Martin School. The event, held as part of the Oxford Literary Festival, saw a panel chaired by Professor Ian Goldin, Director of the Oxford Martin School, debate the question from the perspectives of food, healthcare, ethics and demography. "Is the Planet Full?", a collection of essays by Oxford Martin School academics, edited by Professor Goldin, will be published in May by Oxford University Press.



Professor Jason Hill, Enhancing The Sustainability Of Our Global Food System: A Life Cycle Perspective

May 2014

Professor Jason Hill, McKnight Land-Grant Professor in the Department of Bioproducts and Biosystems Engineering at the University of Minnesota, gave us a lecture on the sustainability of the food system, thanks to a benefaction from Professor Oliver Smithies, which enables Balliol College to bring distinguished visitors to the University of Oxford.

Lecture by Prof Jason Hill - Enhancing The Sustainability Of Our Global Food System: A Life Cycle Perspective from Oxford Future of Food on Vimeo.

Download Professor Jason Hill's slides.


"Is the planet full?" Panel Debate, Oxford Martin School, at the FT Weekend Oxford Literary Festival

March 2014

Speakers: Professor Ian Goldin, Dr Toby Ord, Professor Sarah Harper, Professor Robyn Norton and Professor Charles Godfray

What are the impacts of population growth? Can our planet support the demands of the ten billion people anticipated to be the world's population by the middle of this century?

Leading academics outline their views on how to mitigate the impacts of Earth's burgeoning population in the "Is the Planet Full?" panel debate at the Oxford Martin School. The event, held as part of the Oxford Literary Festival, saw a panel chaired by Professor Ian Goldin, Director of the Oxford Martin School, debate the question from the perspectives of food, healthcare, ethics and demography. "Is the Planet Full?", a collection of essays by Oxford Martin School academics, edited by Professor Goldin, will be published in May by Oxford University Press.



Professor Charles Godfray, "The Role of Sustainable Intensification in Global Food Security"

March 2014

Professor Charles Godfray gave the Florida Climate Institute distinguished scholar seminar sponsored by Kevin and Jeanette Malone on "The Role of Sustainable Intensification in Global Food Security".

You can watch his lecture on the University of Florida website.



Professor James Jones, Model-Based Integrated Assessment of Food Security

February 2014

Professor James Jones visited Oxford in February 2014 and gave us a fascinating lecture about AgMIP, the The Agricultural Model Intercomparison and Improvement Project.

You can listen to his lecture and follow his slides:

Alternatively, you can download the slides separately:


Oxford Martin Programme on the Future of Food Lecture 2013

November 2013

We were honoured to have Professor Susan Jebb give our first annual lecture on the topic of "Food, Health and the Environment: Towards a more Sustainable Diet".

Alternatively, you can download the slides separately:


Oxford Martin School "Big Questions"

As part of the Oxford Martin School's video series of "Big Questions", you can now watch Programme Director Professor Charles Godfray answer some key questions about the future of food:



UBVO (Unit for Biocultural Variation & Obesity) Seminars

The Unit for Biocultural Variation and Obesity (UBVO) is an interdisciplinary research unit based at the University of Oxford, dedicated to understanding the complex and interwoven causes of obesity in populations across the world.

They run a seminar series every year, focusing on different aspects of obesity.

http://podcasts.ox.ac.uk/series/unit-biocultural-variation-and-obesity-ubvo-seminars



Green Templeton Lectures 2013: Feeding a Better Future

The rising cost of food is impacting on people around the world, with up to 1 billion people, who live on the edge of poverty in 30 countries, at risk of hunger because of food shortages. This lecture series explored the causes and impact of the global food crisis, covering food policy, malnutrition and the importance of diet and nutrition in healthy minds and bodies.

http://podcasts.ox.ac.uk/series/green-templeton-lectures-2013-feeding-better-future



Oxford Food Governance Group Seminar Series 2012: The Politics and Practices of Food

The Oxford Food Governance Group (OFG) is a new and interdisciplinary group of researchers from the Institute for Science, Innovation and Society (InSIS), Said Business School and the Unit for Biocultural Variation and Obesity (UBVO) at the University of Oxford, United Kingdom, who share a research interest in food governance practices.

Looking at the politics of food distribution, sustainability, and governance of the food supply among other topics, this series looked at how we get our food and why it matters.

http://podcasts.ox.ac.uk/series/oxford-food-governance-group-politics-and-practices-food



Oxford Martin School - Ethics and Plant Sciences: improving food yields in a changing environment

February 2013

As we struggle to feed the world’s growing population is it ethically wrong not to use all the tools at our disposal to help increase food production? Liam Dolan and Jane Langdale explore the possibilities and benefits that could be derived from using scientific advancement to enhance agricultural production.

http://www.oxfordmartin.ox.ac.uk/videos/view/229



Oxford Martin School - How can 9-10 billion people be fed sustainably and equitably by 2050?

November 2011

The global food system is undergoing a significant phase change that will see an end to the historically low food prices that we have experienced over the last four decades. Challenges on both the supply and demand side suggest that if current trends and practices continue we shall see very significant increases in food prices with threats to the sustainability of food production and particular harm to the world’s poorest. This talk by Professor Charles Godfray explores how food supply, food demand, and food system efficiency and governance needs to change to meet these challenges.

http://www.oxfordmartin.ox.ac.uk/videos/view/131